Search Results for

Monday, December 16, 2019

Year in Review


It has been a great year here at KJB. We added many new products; updated and discontinued some as well. Read on for some of our biggest additions and changes:

Just added is an indoor remote view camera with a long-life battery. The DVR140WF has 15 Hours of continuous recording or up to four months of standby battery time. It is the perfect indoor remote access camera. Plus the manufacturer offers a way to purchase a cloud recording plan.

The DIY110 and DIY110EB are replacing the DIY100 and DIY100EB. The remote view and the sever are more reliable on the new units. The user can see video live, record to a memory card, and check recording on a PC or smart device.

We are discontinuing the KT100, a product that has been in our product line since the beginning. We are looking for similar replacements, so stay tuned.



In late December we'll begin selling another exclusive product called the deScammer. This little handheld device will search for credit card skimmers on gas pumps, ATMs or any suspicious point of sale. Keep your information safe from identity thieves with one-touch protection from the deScammer. Come check us out at CES Eureka Park Booth 52946.


Saving the biggest news for last, KJB Security plans to unveil a new website in the first quarter of 2020. With an updated user interface and search tools it will be more user friendly for both dealers and end users. 

We would also like to take this opportunity to wish you a safe and happy season and a peaceful, prosperous new year. Please take a moment to remember all those who can’t be here this holiday season. Family and friends that will be away from home and Armed Forces members serving here and abroad,

KJB Security is the premier supplier of spy and covert surveillance cameras, GPS trackers and detection devices. With high quality, top-of-the-line equipment for every budget, our customers have many choices of features and prices when purchasing equipment.


Tuesday, October 22, 2019

How Two Step Password Protection Keeps You Safe From Hackers


Recent news stories about less expensive cameras sold by Amazon being hacked should be a wake-up call to anyone trying to buy a hidden camera. A consumer watchdog group revealed that “certain cheap IP cameras found on Amazon can easily let hackers into users' homes.” Most of the less expensive cameras use single step password protection or no password protection at all.

The hidden camera buyer may not even understand the difference until a hacker has already watched them for several days via their security cameras. That hacker now knows their morning routine, when someone is at home or not, and possibly even the security code to a house alarm.

The difference between single step vs. two step password protection
Single step protection means that a snoop or a spy only has to guess one password, usually the one protecting your user account, to gain access to the camera. Two step protection means that the user account has a password - and the camera ALSO has a password. Once the user sets the password for the camera it is yours and yours alone. Not even tech support for most camera manufacturers can access your camera's password.

Some basic password tips
Don’t use any personal information, birthdays, anniversaries, children’s names or “your regular password”. Using a standard password for everything may seem easy but if it is found out, then every account that you used that password on is compromised. Also, popular but easy to guess are favorite sports teams, bands or college names. Strange combinations of swear words may seem to be safe but still are not as secure as you may think. The best passwords include a capitol letter and a lower case letter and at least 1 number and a character such as @,#,* etc.

Investing in a two step password protected camera

The SleuthGear line of cameras features the SG Home DVR; a memory card based hidden camera with Wi-Fi local and remote view, and the SG Home CVR; a cloud based hidden camera system that also offers live and remote view and recording via Wi-Fi using our SG Home app. Not only is the SG Home app use a U.S. based password protected server; the app and camera together require two passwords to be set. The process to set up this two-step password protection is simple and straightforward.  


Monday, September 23, 2019

Don't Let A Foreign Government Ruin Your Morning




This morning the kids were running late, the bus was running early, and you ran out of time to make a quick call to your mom in her new assisted living center.

Finally at your desk, you log in to the remote view camera you installed when she moved in – but instead of seeing your mom's cheerful living room you see a black screen. No picture, no live feed. The camera just stopped working. Looks like the cheap camera you chose has a peace-of-mind cost that you weren't planning on.

KJB uses Amazon Web Servers (AWS) for our line of IP remote view cameras. These servers are all based in the United States. All SleuthGear cameras use AWS to provide live remote view and recording. Unlike less expensive cameras, SleuthGear cameras use a two stage log in and a required password. This two stage authentication protects your videos from getting into the wrong hands, not only from your device but also from the servers housing your videos. Amazon Web Servers require any person using their server to have that dedicated password. Yes the two step authentication can be a bit more complicated set up – but do you want that video of Mom in her new apartment available for strangers to easily hack?

Speaking of your mom's new apartment let's get back to that blank screen. Recently the remote feed from IP cameras similar to SleuthGear was suddenly shut down by the foreign governments housing those servers with no explanation. Individuals using those cameras were left without a live feed and questioned if their recorded videos had been hacked. But customers using KJB's SleuthGear Hidden Cameras reported no such interruption. Amazon Web Servers were not affected.

KJB Security does not make short term security products. We've been in the hidden and remote camera business for twenty years. We back our products with America based tech support and take your peace-of-mind seriously.

Want to see a step by step guide to set up our Amazon Web Server based SleuthGear cameras? For Android users click here, iOS users click here.



Thursday, August 15, 2019



3 Tips for Selling Your Customers DIY Hidden Cameras

While hidden camera designers can be very inventive when hiding a video camera inside a household object, they may not be as imaginative as a DIYer! Read up on our tips for showing off a hidden camera to the DIY audience:

• Make sure the DIY customer knows about the battery life of the camera if applicable and how placement might affect that. High traffic areas will run down battery life causing disappointment for the uninformed DIY customer.

• Educate the DIY customer about the difference between a stand alone DVR and a wi-fi camera. When the customer buys a hidden camera kit to “reverse engineer” an object in their home they may NOT think about how easy it is to go back and retrieve the recorded footage. Explain that a DVR hidden camera captures hidden video on an onboard memory card. While there is no need to set up this stand-alone DVR camera onto a household wi-fi network the customer also will not be able to view the footage remotely or retrieve it without returning to where the camera is placed. A wi-fi enable hidden video camera will allow the user to view the footage remotely possibly making returning for the camera irrelevant.

• Encourage the DIY hidden camera customer to be creative! Think about objects peculiar to their office or home that would work as good hidden video decoys. Are they concerned about neglect at their doggie day spa? Then consider adding a pinhole hidden camera to a food bowl or dog treat container. Do they run a skating rink or arcade and suspect some skaters have figured out how to hack the change machine? Then a DIY project placing a hidden camera in an arcade prize might be the ticket to changing that bad behavior.


Understanding the limits and benefits of a hidden camera along with creating a camera unique to the space it is monitoring are key steps to a successful DIY undercover operation.  


Search Blog